Urban Analysis Report Wivenhoe Central Historic Core

When one visits the place, it would be hard not to notice the church that originates from the Saxon error. The church has a distinctive cupola on top of its sturdy tower that is hard to miss. The aerial view of the town layout appears as the map below with the main distinctive features such as the river easily identifiable. (Google Maps 2012. 77 High St Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex CO7 9AB, UK) The area has an extensive activity in fishing trade, specializing in oysters and soles as they have a high demand in the UK. Wivenhoe Park, designed by Richard Woods (1759), was initially the Rebow’s family home for several centuries. The Rebows are descendants of the Flemish cloth weavers originating from Colchester. The Rebows’ house in the park was the result of a design by Thomas Reynolds. In 1846-7, the park underwent a series of remodeling under supervision of T. Hopper (Hayes, 1993). The town’s population is around nine to ten thousand people. this includes travelers, a large group from the University of Essex that is in the region, and a long-standing artistic community (Embling, 2008). The town has a smart design in a way that the streets are small and old-fashioned, lead into each other and finally head to the attractive waterfront with a lot of fishing boats as well as small sailing crafts. 2. Analysis of the Urban Characteristics of Wivenhoe (Central Historic Core) 2.1. Urban Structure 2.1.1. Framework It was not until 1898 that Wivenhoe became an urban district maintaining this position until in 1974 that is when it was placed among the new Colchester district. The town’s boundaries are because of streams on the east side and north-west part of the town, while River Colne borders it on the west and southern part along with its marshes. Gradual improvement on the river saw isolation of the meadow, which was a marshland on the west bank of the river. 2.1.2. Routes A road cuts through from Colchester heading to Elmstead and Walton-on-the-Naze. The same road cuts through the northeastern section of the ancient parish. Heading further south, there is another road from Colchester heading to Alreford and running from east to west across the Parish area. The same road also has a branch running in the southeast direction pointing towards Brightlingsea. Another road turns southwest and further ahead turns to the south and ends up at Wivenhoe Quay. (StreetMap, 2012. [Online] Available at: http://www.streetmap.co.uk/map.srf?x=604289y=221874z=120sv=wivenhoest=3tl=Map+of+Wivenhoe,+Essex+[Town]searchp=ids.srf [Accessed 2 Oct. 2012]) Another road built privately by De Veres, known as the entry, was also made public before 1566. Most of the other small roads in the city are to link up the river to the main roads. The lane running through the crossing on River Colne starting at the west section and ending at Old Heath was started in 1734. (A view of one of the streets in the town: Wivenhoe Town plan, 2008. [Online] Available at: http://tmf.colchester.gov.uk/servedoc.asp?filename=CORP_LDF_02DEC08_Wivenhoe_TP.pdf) 2.1.3. Spaces The residents of this area that are living on the large housing estates still have complaints with the public transport service. The idea they proposed was for the bus services to be made of larger buses and taking spinal routes to maintain alternative buses for the local community (Wivenhoe Town Council, 2007).