Theories of Management and Translation into Practices of Management

From the time when social organizations were formed for accomplishing goals and objectives, human beings have felt the need for management and coordination of individual initiatives and efforts. With the increasing reliance on group efforts, organized groups expanded and became large, subsequently accounting for the increasing importance and complexity of management. Henceforth, the managerial theories have gained importance with regards to the way managers manage these complex organizations. However, surprisingly there are numerous managers across different parts of the world that have attained immense managerial success even without the basic knowledge of management (Olum, 2004, p.1-2). There are unequivocal views about managers who have applied mixed management theories in their day to day activities and practices have attained greater success in managing their organizations effectively and efficiently and helped them in realizing organizational goals and objectives. Instances show that theories of management cannot be directly translated into practices in the organization and thus managers belonging to the contemporary organizations must appreciate their respective roles in the organizations while seeking to achieve set goals and objectives (Olum, 2004, p.1-2). …
process in which people influences others so as to make them understand and agree to their terms with regards to what needs doing and in the process facilitates individuals and collective efforts to attain shared goals and objectives on the organization (Laguerre, 2010, p.6). The definition developed by the author not only suggests and includes efforts for influencing and facilitating the present works undertaken in the group, but it also ensures that individuals in the group are ready and prepared to encounter future challenges and problems at the workplace. Even though the definition of Yukl is highly comprehensive, there are several researchers who have put forth such definitions which are more narrowly focused. For example, researchers like Coons &amp. Hemphill (1957) believe that leadership is nothing but the behavior of a person or individual which helps to direct the activities and performance of a group towards shared goals and objectives. Kahn &amp. Katz (1978) believes that leadership accounts for the influential increment above and over the mechanical compliances with the custom directives in the organization (Laguerre, 2010, p.6). The varying definition of leadership also accounts for its difficulty in practical application in the organization. It is because perspectives differ between individuals and this accounts for the reason how different researchers define management and leadership as per their own perspectives (Daft &amp. Lane, 2008, p.4). As a consequence of the above fact, when researchers conduct leadership studies, they assume different definitions of leadership such that confusion in the interpretation of results can be eliminated or removed.&nbsp.&nbsp.