The Compromise of 1877

Legislation to help rebuild the South had to be drafted. The first two conditions were set into motion, the last two never came to a realization.The 1876 Presidential Election between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel J. Tilden occurred eleven years after the American Civil War. Reconstruction was winding down. The North and the South were tiring of Reconstruction. The spoils of war had already been plundered, making the Carpetbaggers, Union soldiers, and Northerners eager to head home. The Southerners were sick of the Northerner’s interference in local matters. So when the 1876 Presidential Election resulted in an electoral vote of 185 to 184 favoring Hayes, but a popular vote of 4,034,311 to 4,288,546 in favor of Tilden, an opportunity to end Reconstruction presented itself (Robinson, 123). A look at both candidate’s views and affiliations can explain the dilemma and its resolution.Rutherford B. Hayes was the Republican nominee for the 1876 Presidential election. He was nominated by the Republicans for several reasons. The first as the former Governor of Ohio, Hayes came from a strategic electoral state (Johnson, 264). Hayes was a typical Republican candidate at the time, which meant he was very conservative. His campaign promised reform, punishment for corrupt officials, and even gave a nod toward the woman’s rights advocates (Johnson, 264). Otherwise, Hayes represented the normal Republican interests, like promoting business and other conservative issues.After the Civil War, the Republicans received a reputation for corruption. The North had crushed the Southern rebellion but at a high cost. This cost was not only measured monetarily but in human casualties as well. After Abraham Lincolns assassination, Andrew Johnson became president. Although Andrew Johnson tried to ease the Reconstruction period for both the Northerners and Southerners, Radical Republicans wanted more.