Stress at Workplace

The threshold level of stress as experienced by different people depends on the individual appraisal of the demands of their work. Such subjective appraisal of work demands is affected by a myriad of other factors that may not be work-related, for instance, socio-economic factors. Apart from these, there are other factors that may affect workers’ appraisal of demand include race, gender, age, geographic location, health, housing, number of children community work and family arrangements (Arnold, et al. 2010). Furthermore, there should be a consideration of specific psychological factors that include personal traits and experiences. Lastly, stress level depends on the worker’s interpretation of threatening demand and whether he or she believes that he or she can meet the demands of that particular job. Thus, all these psychological and social variables profoundly affect experiences of stress by different individuals. Subjective self-evaluations reported by an individual are valid just like objective data collected on an individual which includes aspects such as absenteeism and accidents.As the national association of mental health reported recently, the worker’s personality and coping strategy have direct perceptual or moderating effects on outcomes of stress. For instance, a socially isolating job will be more stressful to an extrovert while an introvert will find work that needs more social interaction to be stressful and difficult (Fincham, et al 2005) the coping skills that this person possesses. Thus, one job that is stressful to one worker is likely not to be stressful to another. That means that while putting across preventive measures on workplace stress. one should always consider the difference in perception of stress. Numerous strategies have to be devised to manage stressful situations for different workers depending on their personality and coping skills.