On Antoni Gaudi’s Casa Batllo

ANTONI GAUDI’S CASA BATLLO Architectural works are normally unique and a manifestation of one’s imagination. Through this works, an architect has anopportunity to express art shapes using different ornamentation. Considering that architects’ works are unique as a result of one’s imagination, this research paper will investigate on Antoni Gaudi’s Casa Batllo. The paper focuses on this building interior space by analyzing on its different characteristics and the architecture. Casa Batllo is one of the buildings designed by Antoni Gaudi in 1904. It is located in Barcelona England1. The buildings creative floors and incrassate facades is what portrays the creativity of this architect. Looking at the building, one will realize that this designer had an aim of avoiding straight lines. It is believed that this building signifies the lance of Saint George. Below is an image of the building: The interior appearance and materials for the building signify the one thing that portrays the outstanding imagination of Antoni Gaudi. While renovating the interior of the building, Gaudi had an objective of improving on its illumination. He allowed two skylights to illuminate the building up to the ground floor. These skylights are shaped like the shells of a tortoise. They are formed from a spine of a gigantic animal and carved with fine hardwood to rise up as a banister. At the ground floor, a patio is used to distribute this light evenly. This gets aided by a chromatic straight gradation from the interior ceramic walls that range from dark blue to white. The ground floor windows are also bigger in size to compensate for the weak skylight intensity in this area. This design makes the building to be environmental friendly. A sturdy iron rail that runs from the entrance hall to the ground was used to ensure privacy in the Batllo. The building’s staircases gets made up of wood. The ceilings are vaulted. The noble floor -the residence of Batllo family- has a new layout designed with internal walls that seem to be undulating 2. There is a family courtyard in the centre of the building, which can be accessed via the dining room and it is one of the most private area of the house. There exist different contexts that try to give meaning to this iconic building. There are individuals who interpret the curves of this building as a symbol of the waves of the sea, in addition, they believe that its ceramic and ornamentation designs compares to the color of the marine alga and fauna. In a different context, some believe that the building is an allusion to symbolize Carnival time3. This belief is strengthened by fantasy shapes of the cast iron grilles placed on the balconies. These shapes are similar to Venetian masks. It is also thought this the shapes of the balconies represents the skulls of the dragon victims in the legend of Sant Jordi. The scale-like ceramics roof top and a four-armed cross is a representation of this dragon and the sword by used by Sant Jordi in killing the dragon respectively. The building also reflects on religious imagery. The building has semi-concealed and embedded images and texts placed in the upper area of the building and around the facade. For instance, the building has a four-pointed transverse cross. One can interpret that Gaudi was designing this building to glorify God. Casa Batllo also has self contained floors with a roof terrace. The noble floor has a private access, though. it also has a communal stairwell. This stairwell is tiled, making it appear like the exterior facade. One can access the couch houses from the street. These houses are located below the courtyard. Initially, this building was designed to accommodate members of the middle class. Unfortunately, many buyers undervalued it due to its design. Later, Joseph Batllo bought the building because he valued its place of location. Batllo was one of the main stakeholders in textile industry. He was determined to demolish the initial building and construct another one. However, the idea of refurbishing it came to mind4. This building then became a home for Batllo and his family. After his death, his wife and children managed the house. Later, an insurance company took over and used it as an office. In the following years, the building currency refurbished it and began to hire this building for other events. Much of this building space has been rented. This activity of renting this building is reinforced by its place of location, and the beautiful facilities. Its demand has remained high. In conclusion, Casa Batllo building is an outstanding manifestation of imagined architects’ works. Antoni Gaudi imagination of applying animal shapes, copy of skeleton and bone, vine-like curves and the use of admirable color bits attracts the attention of observers. Gaudi’s idea of maximizing on the use of natural light to illuminate the building is also outstanding. Generally, the imaginations used by Gaudi are commendable because they are still relevant up to today. It is because of his beatification that the building attracts different events and the need for maintaining it. Notes 1. Francesca Bacci Melcher, David, Art and Senses (Oxford University Press, 2011), 112 2. David Pearson, New Organic Architecture: The Breaking Wave (California: California University Press, 2001), 45 3. Lluis, Talosa, Barcelona, Gaudi and Modernism, (Madrid: A. Asppan S.L, 2001), 78 4. Rainer Zabster, Gaudi, 1852 – 1926: Antoni Gaudi i Cornet: a life devoted to architecture. (Cologne, Germany: Taschen, 2002), 121. Bibliography Bacci, F. Melcher, D. Art and Senses. Oxford: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pearson, David. New Organic Architecture: The Breaking Wave. California: California University Press, 2001. Tolosa, Lluis. Barcelona, Gaudi and Modernism. Madrid: A. Asppan S.L, 2001. Zebster, Rainer. Gaudi, 1852 – 1926: Antoni Gaudi i Cornet: a life devoted to architecture. Cologne, Germany: Taschen, 2002.