National Family Legal Foundation To Be or not to Be

Early in 1995, a successful real estate developer in Arizona by the name of Charles Dunlap was invited to join a local nonprofit organization known as the National Family Legal Foundation. This organization, which began as a small group of concerned citizens in the 1950s, had dedicated itself to fighting the spread, creation, and distribution of pornographic materials. Specifically, the National Family Legal Foundation fought against the purveyors of child pornography. Although Dunlap held most of the qualities needed by the NFLF, he was less than enthusiastic about the organization and about the offer to join. Dunlap believed the organization to be lacking in influence, monies, and motivation: all key aspects to saving a previously prosperous and well-organized organization. Upon accepting the offer under the condition that he would remain on the Board of Directors for a one-year period, Dunlap realized just how disorganized and ineffective the National Family Legal Foundation had become. Dunlap came to realize that he must make a decision: to either allow the National Family Legal Foundation to cease functions and dissipate, or to come up with a plan to save the foundation.The National Family Legal Foundation (NFLF) began as a small group known as the Citizens for Decent Literature (CDL). Charles Keating, a young and assertive lawyer in Cincinnati, started the group as a means to urge prosecutors to begin filing suits against those people who made a living through the publication and distribution of pornographic and other obscene materials–specifically, the purveyors of child pornography (Buntin, 1999). The Citizens for Decent Literature began in 1957. however, by 1967 the group had already grown into a national organization with more than 300 national chapters.During the 1970s, Keating’s empire grew to include a real-estate development organization–the American Continental Corporation–in Phoenix, Arizona and later Lincoln Savings and Loans in Irvine, California.