Multimedia &amp

DesignIt is therefore vital to acknowledge that emotional effect by a product to its users has to be made one of the focal point in the design process. Norman greatly recognizes the necessity of emotional appreciation in the available products, goods and services to the human beings (Norman, 2004). Figure 1: Key design considerations Throughout the scheme of importance of experiences and emotions, Normans has laid key emphasis on the importance of emotional appreciation. In addressing the subject, Norman divides human’s appreciation with focus laid at two notions that influence appreciation (Norman, 2004). These notions are visceral and aesthetic appreciation. Visceral appreciation engrosses a human being’s pleasure to something motivated by one’s natural intelligence or knowledge in practical circumstances where any of the stimuli sensory faculties are triggered from in or outside an individual’s body (Norman, 2004). The stimuli faculties here include an individual’s ability to hear, view around (sight), smell, equilibrium, taste and touch. Triggering of the sensory stimuli leads an individual to consider something as favorable or unfavorable. On the other aesthetic appreciation encompasses the decisive reflection on art, nature and culture driven by one’s judgment of outlook or even taste. In brief, the second Norman’s division of emotional appreciation is based on one’s sensor-emotional values (Norman, 2004). Thorough analyses of the visceral and aesthetic appreciation provide a clarified detail of each and their integration to trigger an individual’s appreciation of one thing over another (Norman, 2004). Clearly, visceral appreciation focuses keenly on one being driven by the stimulus factors in or outside one’s environs. In this sense, it clarifies that visceral appreciation significantly revolves around effects of a product or service on one or a number of the stimulus faculties. For aesthetic appreciation, emphasis is laid on an individual’s sensory implication or sentimental judgment of a product, service or things around. It is hereby clear that the two do not have to be separated since revolve almost the same notion. To be precise, I disagree with Norman’s idea of dividing emotional appreciation based on the two. Norman clearly over complicates the idea of emotional appreciation. From point of view and thorough scrutiny of the subject, I can deduct that, emotional appreciation is based on the sensory effects resulting from only stimulus faculties and experience on a product or service. In other words, this clarifies that since aesthetic appreciation focuses on sensory judgment of a thing, then it (aesthetic appreciation) must involve one or more of the stimuli faculties. Therefore, if the stimuli must be involved, then that means it (aesthetic appreciation) depends on a key component of the visceral appreciation (Norman, 2004). This is because, as analyzed earlier, visceral appreciation focuses mainly on the effects of stimulus faculties in or outside one’s body. It is in this sense that I prefer that Norman should have merged the visceral and aesthetic appreciation instead of separating them. In addition, the experience levels an individual has on a product or service with relation to another further enhances that individual’