Long distance relationship in international student

Long distance relationship in international Long distance relationship in international Long distance relationship is regarded as long-distance when communication is restricted due to the geographic distance while the partners in a relationship have a desire for continued and close connection. Research shows that twenty-five to fifty percent of university students are in a long distance relationship at any given period. Long distance relationship concerns three categories of persons: friends, family, and romantic partners. An international student is likely to be affected by schooling in overseas as this will have an impact on the relationship the student has with the people at home (Skinner, 2005). For three to four years, the established relationships with other people outside the university will tend to change. Some of the changes may be even harder to control. Additionally, maintaining a romantic relationship for international students may pose numerous challenges. Most of the students can enjoy reliable, fruitful and happy relationships regardless of the long distances though it is not easy either.
Long distance relationships are qualitatively distinct from relationships that are close geographically. One feature of a long distance relationship is that there are raised financial burdens to sustain the relationship. Another important feature of a long distance relationship is difficulties in maintaining a geographically friendship. In non-romantic relationships, international students have been able to use the new technology to maintain strong social ties between family members and friends. It is quite hard for an international student to judge the state of their relationship with friends, family members and their romantic partners from a distance. Research investigating the factors that are linked with long-distance relationships has reported that intimacy, relationship satisfaction and level of consensus are positively interrelated with relationship stability. The more effort made by students to maintain the relationship, the longer a relationship stays (Gulder, 1996).
New communications technologies make communication among persons at a distance easier than in the past. Before the introduction of the internet, long distance relationships were rare as primary communication between lovers commonly involved telephone conversation or emails. Students had a fear for schooling abroad so they could not be parted from their friends, families, and their romantic lovers. Nowadays, students do not worry too much about schooling abroad as they can communicate with their loved ones as much as they would wish through an online social network like Twitter and Facebook. Students who have routine, tactical relational maintenance behaviors and who use social networks can easily, maintain a long distance relationship. Having positivity, openness, assurance, network, shared tasks, as well as conflict management, are some of the strategic and routine maintenance behaviors. Maintenance of close connection between family members and a friend can be maintained through keeping in touch by sending text messages, emails and, making phone calls. Students schooling abroad should realize that all relationships, new and old are bound to change (Knox, Zusman, &amp. Daniels, 2002).
Conclusion
In conclusion, a long distance relationship is said to be the long distance when communication is constrained due to the geographic distance while the partners in a relationship have a desire for continued and close connection. Long distance relationship concerns three categories of persons: friends, family, and romantic partners. Established relationships outside the university are likely to change over the years spent in school. Long distance relationships are qualitatively distinct from relationships that are close geographically. New communications technologies make communication among persons at a distance easier than in the past.
References
Gulder, G. (1996). Long-distance romantic relationships: Prevalence and separation-related
Symptoms in college. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54(6), 980-988.
Knox, D., Zusman, M., &amp. Daniels, V. (2002). Absence makes the heart grow fonder? Long
Distance dating relationships among college students. College Student Journal, 36(3), 364-366.
Skinner, B. (2005). Perceptions of College Students in Long Distance Relationships. UW-L
Journal of Undergraduate Research VIII, viii(3), 1-4.