Have social movements been successful in achieving their objectives in Latin America

The good thing about these social revolts is their capacity to bring forward advantages on the part of various social movements which continue to evolve, making them more sophisticated and expert on achieving their objectives. In this paper, the proponent tries to explore significant proofs which substantially points out social movements in Latin America to have been successful in achieving their objectives. The case of Rural Landless Workers Movement The Rural Landless Workers Movement (MST) is a case of how a social movement has been successful in Latin America based on the achievement of its objectives. There are specifically two important points MST has substantially done in order to fulfill its objectives. The first point is its ability to maintain strong level of leadership towards its members. It has become a highly structured group knowing that it involves thousands of members. In groups like this, a modern approach in leadership is necessary in order to unite the team with only one vision and goal. Furthermore, MST learned enough the power of taking advantage on achieving allies. As a result, MST was able to combine forces with other social movements in Brazil. The very presence of these various social movements in Brazil alone is a substantial proof that people have seen them as potential tools in achieving objectives through a specific social transformation. All of these proved that social movements in Brazil can be the best and powerful way on how the masses of people substantially can achieve their personal claims in a society where everyone seems to have varying social, political, and economic needs. The (MST) in Brazil, having more than 300,000 members and consisting of 350,000 peasant families, is a highly organised social movement in Latin America with allies in other social movements such as urban Homeless Movement, the Catholic Pastoral Rural (Rural Pastoral Agency), sectors of the trade union movement (CUT), the left-wing of the Workers Party (PT) and academic faculty and students (Petras, 2009). This social movement is capable of organising effective tactics in allocating land for their thousands of landless rural workers and their families on the lands of giant latifundistas, plus being able to succeed in placing their agrarian reform on the national agenda, and elected Lula Da Silva of the Workers Party in the 2002 presidential elections (Petras, 2009). MST is a picture of a highly sophisticated social movement having been able to penetrate the core foundation of social transformation. Its ability to create a better foundation for its entire movement is a specific proof that it has substantially created a remarkable way on how to obtain its specific objectives. Its ability to organise a large social group of 300,000 members and 350,000 peasant families was enough to create a strong allies with other social movements. What is depicted in this issue is the thought that in Brazil alone, social movements have become so widely considered and even have created a powerful force to influence the ongoing social transformation. This is the very reason why MST for instance was substantially able to penetrate and influence