Faith and Work Integration

Indeed, there exist personal, ethical, and corporate dilemmas that ran at parallelsTo start with, faith and work are two opposites in many aspects. Theology has separated itself from the everyday of people’s lives. R. Paul Stevenson defines my spiritual dilemma based on the central question in the epilogue of his book The Other Sox Days. My view on work is that it is an activity undertaken to put bread on the table. People are always willing to work seven days a week without going to church. The church is not interested in the other six days that people spend in the workplace. This has led to an increased polarity between faith and the workplace. Faith and religion appear to be in conflict when my work demands that I work on Sunday, which is against church principles. This has resulted in me stop working for employers who require employees to work on Sunday.It is often hard to determine what guides our actions in the workplace. Faith and work share a lot of virtues we practice. Honesty is the virtue required in the workplace and it instilled in us from our religious backgrounds. In the workplace, company policies stress the need for honesty in procedures and ethical conduct. This virtue in the workplace integrates well with faith. We need to be vigilant when working under pressure to meet deadlines.Deuteronomy 16:19, tells us that bribe blinds the eye of the wise and twists the word of the righteous. Nevertheless, how far do businesses go marketing? There is no problem with giving free samples of your product to the customer because it is providing an opportunity for the customer to assess the product or service. However, where do you draw the line? When do the provision of free samples and gifts bear with the implied understanding that product or service will be brought in return. because, at this point, my faith makes it become a bribe? From a Christian perspective, marketing must be done in an honest way.