ELL Director

Under the law, each school and district should make sure that the student as a whole, and their subgroups such as ELLs, meet the needed academic regulations in reading, as well as math. To make adequate annually progress, each school and district should generally show that every subgroup has achieved the state proficiency aim in reading, as well as math (Capps, Fix, Murray, Ost, Passel Herwantoro, 2005). Correctly assessing ELLs in English as obliged by the law is extremely tough. These students are expected to comprehend all content in English prior to reaching a certain degree of English proficiency. Accommodations offered during the assessment are normally of limited value and doubtful validity. On top of these reading and math tests, ELLs also are expected meet various English proficiency benchmarks. hence, troubling them in their learning (Roekel, 2007). In the next section of this paper, we will address the challenges facing this students and ways of curbing them. Challenges Relating to Assessing Language Domains before and During Content-Based Instruction English Language Learners come from extremely diverse backgrounds and normally encounter numerous difficulties in the classroom (Roekel, 2007). To cause further difficulties, educators lack useful, research-based facts, strategies and resources required to evaluate, teach and nurture these types of students, whether the ELLs were born in the United States or another place, or whether they are the earliest, middle, or latest generation to be enrolled in an American public school. In a lot of cases, ELLs are being given math and reading tests in English prior to gaining enough knowledge or understanding in English. The matter of communication seems large for educators of ELLs. A 2004 study of teachers in California found out that poor communication among teachers, learners, parents, as well as the community, was a massive problem. Other issues comprised of the lack of tools to educate ELL students and proper assessments to identify learners’ needs, as well as measure student progress (Capps, Fix, Murray, Ost, Passel Herwantoro, 2005). Educators also expressed disappointment over the broad variety of English language and academic levels along with the fact that they get little in-service training or professional development on how to educate/train ELLs. As the size of ELLs continues to grow, for instance, more teachers will be faced with the issue of successful second language literacy instruction (Short Fitzsimmons, 2006). Meeting the educational requirements of ELLs is a difficult task. It is one that needs harmonization and teamwork all through the educational system. This means that everyone should support the learning needs of English Language Learners, beginning with schools of education, which should better prepare all educators to work supportively with ELLs (Roekel, 2007). Also, educators themselves argue that proper professional development and enhancement is amongst their top requirements. Also, another common or universal problem relating to assessing language domains among ELL students is offering a significant access to the program (Roekel, 2007). This is because there has been a tendency of viewing ELLs with learning difficulties also because they are just low-performing English