Developing a teaching plan

The nurse practitioner model creates enhanced patient-nurse relationships, which provide both self-care education and cancelling within the context of disease state management. The nurse teacher for a diabetic person needs to assess the patient’s needs, predict the expected outcomes from the teaching, and develop intervention plans based on a suitable nursing theory. Patient Assessment Albert Boyle is a 69-year-old man with five-year history of type 2 diabetes (Spollett, 2003). The doctors diagnosed Joseph’s condition in the year 1997. Two years prior to diabetes type 2 diagnoses, Albert Boyle had symptoms indicating hyperglycemia. Albert’s fasting blood glucose ranged between 118-127 mg/dl (Spollett, 2003). The doctors advised Albert to lose at least 10 lb of his weight, but he did not take any action. The family physician referred Albert Boyle the diabetes specialty clinic where he reported recent weight gain, foot pain, and suboptimal diabetes control. Albert’s attempts to lose weight through increased exercises were not successful. Albert takes 10 mg of atorvastatin daily for hypercholesterolemia (Spollett, 2003). He took gymnema sylvestre, pancrease elixir and chromium picolinate with an attempt to improve his diabetic condition. however, he stopped these supplements because he did not see any improvements (Spollett, 2003). Albert Boyle does not test the levels of his blood glucose at home because he does not belief that this condition would help him improve his diabetes control. Albert questions the benefits of knowing the numbers since after all the doctor is already aware that the sugar level is high. Albert Boyle does not have knowledge of diabetes self-care management, and expresses that he is worried about what causes his diabetic condition since he does not eat sugar. Albert has been physically active by playing golf once in a week and gardening. however, he has reduced more than 3 lb of weight (Spollett, 2003). Albert has neither consulted a dietician nor been instructed in self-monitoring of blood glucose. Defining Characteristics Albert Boyle has a misconception about the approaches to improve his health status. He does not believe that knowing his health status can help him manage his diabetes control. Albert argues that there is no need of him of knowing his blood-sugar level. he claims that the doctors already know that the level of sugar in his body is high. Another characteristic of Albert Boyle is that he does not demonstrate self-care skills concerning his diabetic controls. Albert is not aware of the critical skills that are required to control his blood sugar. Albert does not believe that he is diabetic. This is evidenced by the fact that he questions the source of the condition, and he does not eat sugar. Albert is ignorant that direct intake of sugar does not cause diabetes. Diabetes results from two factors: when the pancreas fails to produce insulin, and when the cells fail to respond to the insulin that is produced (Boswell, 2007). This leads to accumulation of blood sugar in the body. Related Factors Patients with diabetic conditions have extremely comprehensive learning needs. The diabetic patients’ needs focus on informing them proper measures of managing their sugar levels and preventing their diabetic condition