Coursework 3 elements

Retailers have the prerogative of declining acceptance of products they deem do not conform to set standards. These provisions encompass verification of technical performance at food production sites. 1.1 Literature review British Retail Consortium The British Retail Consortium formulated in 1998 the BRC Technical Standard and Protocol for organisations intend on engaging in supply of retailer food products. This Standard was to be used in verification of food production site technical performance. Before the formulation of this Standard, UK retailers undertook their verification using individual, internally developed standards and in some situations in collaboration with third-party inspection bodies. The BRC Food Technical Standard has evolved since its inception to not only catering for the supply of retailer branded products but also covering other areas of the food industry. The new additions are for example the food service and ingredients manufacture sectors. The BRC Food Technical Standard, has been used outside the UK as a benchmark by retailers to assess their suppliers as described by (BRC Global Standards 2006 P.120). This development led to the change of name to BRC Global Standard – Food. This was to reflect the worldwide embrace of its principles and partnerships for best safety practices. The BRC Global Standard stipulates that an organisation should put in place structures that ensure facilitate quality and efficiency in production processes, management of the production environment and proper utilisation of human resources. There are substantial benefits derived from the use of the BRC Global Standard – Food. First, it offers a one stop shop certification process allowing collaboration with other certification bodies and accreditation to an international Standard ISO/IEC Guide 65. Secondly, the single verification acquired by the manufacturer or supplier allow reporting of the safety status of the food as per their agreement. Thirdly, the Standard encompasses quality, hygiene, product safety and the production environment. Fourthly, food manufacturers may find the Standard useful in ensuring that their suppliers are adhering to good hygiene practices hence completing the ‘due diligence’ chain. There is also a requirement for continued monitoring and evaluation in order to apply corrective measures. This ensures a self-improving quality, hygiene and product safety system. The BRC Global Standard – Food’s effectiveness emanates from some principles. One such principle is eradication of duplication of evaluation procedures among member organisations. This is possible through consultations among the accreditation and certification bodies and the BRC. This has the overall effect of smooth certification procedures. The International Food Standard (IFS) This is an association of retailing companies in Central European countries of Austria, Switzerland, France and Germany. It is an equivalent of the British Retail Consortium and serves to facilitate effective selection of branded food suppliers for the retailers on their ability to maintain supply of safe food products. The suppliers should also conform to statutory and contractual requirements. IFS provide the evaluation benchmarks for organisations manufacturing retail food products. It is mostly useful in situations where the product is processed or handled (on site performance), or where there