Asylum Seekers and Refugee in Britain

On the contrary, the definition is insufficient to signify violation of individual human rights or to show that he or she has been prosecuted by the state. In that case, if an individual’s case for seeking asylum is not conventional, she or he is not granted with humanitarian protection or decretory leave. There exist various reasons why there is an increment in number in terms of individuals seeking asylum in Britain. Young people and children seeking refuge in Britain is not a phenomena that is new. It has occurred over decades. Majority of them evade from situations such as economic hardship, abuse and war (Cool 2001, p.840). Nevertheless, in the late 1980s, asylum seekers getting into Britain increased significantly because of increased military and civil conflict, environmental degradation and the state structures breakdown in Eastern side of Europe that dislocated individuals from their homes. This triggered the British governments to implement policies that are restrictive on asylum. The policies have resulted in increased difficulties for refugees to access Britain. In addition to that, they have greatly reduced asylum seekers rights to welfare provision and social support. In 1982, successful refugee applications decreased from fifty nine percent (59%) to 10 %( ten percent) in the 1990s (Home Office 2004). Entry conditions have inflamed debates and Fortress Europe policy creation making it difficult for Britain to come up with formal programs and policies for refugees’ resettlement. Britain asylum seekers originate from ten principal countries. These are such as Zimbabwe, Sudan, Afghanistan, India, Eritrea, Pakistan, Iraq, Somalia, China and Iran. They account for 60% (sixty percent) of all applications for asylum seeking. In 2003, majority of asylum seekers came from Iran, Zimbabwe, China, Iraq and Somali thus accounting for 38% of all the applicants (Home Office 2004, p.29). From the available empirical evidence, discrimination and repression against minorities, abuse of human rights and ethnic conflicts are the key driving forces in the increased number of asylum seekers in Britain from the above-mentioned countries. This was experienced between 1990 and 2000. However, this evidence contradicts with the existing assumption that, refuges in reality are economic migrants, thus not all refugees from the ten mentioned countries are in dire need of protection. This is because, decisions and reasons by an individual to vacate his or her country are extremely complex and this is what determines the process of asylum seeker (Asylum in the UK 2005, P.4). Asylum Seekers Statistics in Britain The number of individuals applying for refugee in Britain peaked in 2002. The numbers of applicants recorded were 84,000. However, the number declined sharply to fewer than eighteen thousand (18,000) in the year 2010 a digit lower compared to other years since 1889(Hawkins 2010, p.2). The asylum seeking process in Britain divides applicants into two broad categories. In that case, we have the dependants and the principal applicants. Home Office Statistics measure principal applicants’ appeals, refusals, grants and applications. In 2010, Britain had 17,790 applications. The number was the lowest since 1989.In late 1990s, the asylum application increased consistently. For instance, in 1996, Britain had 29,640 applicants and in 2000, the number totalled to 80,315. The subsequent two years, the number stood above 70,000 and in 2002, the number recorded a new level of 84,139 applicants. In the