American Trade and Imperialism

ing this period, America started to influence the cultural, military, social, political, and economic nature of other nations that enabled America to expand its power and influence to foreign territories. Various factors led to the emergence and adoption of the American imperialism policy. These factors include the Spanish-American war where America sought the independence of Cuba by compelling Spain to withdraw from Cuba. The American need to annex Hawaii due to its immense natural resources and arable lands also fostered American imperialism. The American push for an Open Door trading policy in China that allowed America to have equal trading rights in China and the American quest to participate in international trade also led to American trade and imperialism. American imperialism led to various effects on America, its colonies, and other European nations. Such effects have been consistent and significant throughout the centuries. This paper addresses the political, economic, military, cultural, and social influence of American trade and imperialism on America and other foreign nations.
Since the early 1990s, the American economic interest had been superseding the American belief in democracy. Before the early 1990s, America had been opposing imperialism for many years. In simple terms, American imperialism relates to the political, economic, social, or cultural influence of the U.S on other foreign nations (Hobson 1). The influence emanating from this policy enabled America to participate in international trade and expand its power into powerless nations like Cuba. It is worth noting that the American need to become a dominant force in international trade and global affairs prompted America to disregard its democratic capitalism system of governance and focus on its economic interests (Hawkins 1). It is clear that the American imperialism began between 1870 and 1916 subject to distinct factors that equally led to the successful adoption of this policy. For