“Almost Astronauts 13 Women Who Dared to Dream

Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King The House Baba Built"Biography
Stone, Tanya Lee. Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream. New York: Candlewick, 2009.
Summary
Author Stone writes about the traits of an ordinary astronaut and compares them to those required of female astronauts. To be an astronaut, the book explains that one has to be brilliant in flying, resistant to work pressure, healthy, and especially proficient in engineering, mathematics, and physics. Stone adds that the establishment of NASA included the male trait as an unspoken qualification for being an astronaut (Stone 83). Stone then narrates how thirteen women showed that they were as tough as tough and bold as men were in terms of qualifying for a trip to space and were willing to confront the government about this gender bias.
Critical Analysis
Stone assumes a tone of righteous outrage in reporting the idealistic efforts of thirteen women who sought after admittance to NASA. NASA’s administration blocked these women through discrimination, jealousy, and the incomprehensible note of one of the most influential men in Washington. Although the Mercury 13 women did not travel to space, it was not a loss. These women set an example for other women to empower their roles in space exploration (Stone 107).
Rappaport, Doreen. Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. New York: Hyperion Book CH, 2007.
Summary
Rappaport outlines a biography of legendary activist Martin Luther King mainly through imagery. The text introduces young readers to the world of influential activism and knowledge pertaining to the history of ethnicity in the United States as seen by King. Rappaport laces the renowned words of King into a captivating story of his own life (Rappaport 16). Much-admired artist Bryan Collier uses his stunning talent to capture the attention of the book’s readers and embed an overall picture of King as a man who dreamt of change in the United States and across the globe.
Critical Analysis
Rappaport contrasts her initial writing with quotes by King in an effort to depict the related nature of the problems they experienced while growing up. For instance, the text paints a takeoff of scenarios from King’s literature of how he saw posts reading marking areas for white people only across his childhood neighborhood (Rappaport 7). Rappaport depends on King’s individual words, influence, passion, and nonviolent attitude to create a shining biography. Several illustrations are complicated responses of stained glass windows that Collier addresses at the beginning of the text as representations of King’s life.
Young, Ed. The House Baba Built. New York: Little, Brown Books, 2011.
Summary
The home author Young grew up in did not seem as plain as others would assume. According to Young, a rocking chair could turn into a horse, a roof could turn into a roller floor, and empty swimming pool could turn into a place for riding scooters and bicycles (Young 21). The house Young’s father constructed changed into any place the family needed. Young narrates how such abilities were useful tools for a family living a war-stricken China.
Critical Analysis
Young puts down rich descriptions of his odd childhood together with cleverly cutout pictures and foldout pages. These elements turn the book into an interesting read for the young and aged similarly. One can easily relate to Young’s numerous experiences. For instance, picnics and affectionate parents are a widespread norm today (Young 38). Such connections with the author enable readers to accept and comprehend the more peculiar aspects of Young’s childhood like food scarcity and refugees.
Works Cited
Rappaport, Doreen. Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. New York: Hyperion Book CH, 2007. Print.
Stone, Tanya Lee. Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream. New York: Candlewick, 2009. Print.
Young, Ed. The House Baba Built. New York: Little, Brown Books, 2011. Print.